Featured News 2016 Tips for Dealing With Insurance Companies

Tips for Dealing With Insurance Companies

In today's society, car accidents are a part of life. They are so prevalent, you'd probably have a difficult time finding an adult over 30 years of age who has not been in at least one accident in their lifetime.

When people are in an accident, they'll eventually have to deal with one, if not two insurance companies. The problem is that usually insurance companies are in the practice of: 1) devaluing claims, 2) denying claims, and 3) trying to avoid financial responsibility.

We're not only talking about the other driver's auto insurance company, we're talking about yours too. Auto insurance companies are "for profit" companies, and no insurance adjuster ever received a pat on the back for paying out a large settlement.

Whether you're being interviewed by your own insurance company, or you receive a call from the other driver's insurance company, here are some tips to remember:

1. Never admit fault. Even if you believe the accident was your fault, never admit to it. If you take the blame, it could impact your settlement and your insurance premium. It's better to leave it up to the insurance companies to decide.

2. Don't offer your opinion. You don't want to offer opinions as fact. If your estimates are wrong, it could complicate your claim. If you ever give an opinion, be sure to say, "In my opinion."

3. Don't lie to the insurance company. You don't want to lie to an insurance company because that would be fraud and you could face criminal charges.

4. Be honest about any medications you are on. Many insurance policies require that the driver submits to a chemical test (e.g. blood or urine). If you were on medical marijuana, Xanax, Vicodin, or another medication on the day of the accident, don't lie about it. The chemical test will tell the insurance company everything you didn't.

5. Don't be overly friendly. If you're too friendly, you can let your guard down and say the wrong things. Stick to the facts instead and keep it strictly business.

6. Don't give a recorded statement to the other driver's insurance company. If you do, they'll try to find a way to use your words against you.

7. Don't sign a medical release. Insurance companies want to see medical records so they can find "pre-existing" injuries. Your medical records are your business and they're protected by federal law, so don't sign a medical release.

Injured in an automobile accident? To file a claim for compensation, contact a car accident lawyer today!

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